A Television Designed for the Outdoors

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Outdoor spaces typically suffer -- or benefit -- from the lack of television. SunBrite TVs are designed to work outside.

Television sets do not normally do well in extreme heat, cold or the typical monsoon. But SunBrite TVs are adapted from the industrial displays the company builds for use in places like ballpark concession stands.

Its consumer TVs, the Signature series, are available in four sizes, from 32 inches to 65 inches, priced from $1,500 to $7,000. They borrow technology from the industrial sets to withstand the elements (for the minimum of a two-year warranty) and to be seen even on sunny days.

The company said the sets were made of moisture-resistant parts, primarily from Asia, and assembled in the United States. The television is enclosed in a weather-resistant plastic case with four multispeed fans to cool the inside in hot weather. The case is ventilated with filters fine enough to pass air but not dust. It also provides a barrier to spiders, which like to nest in warm, protected places.

The SunBrite screen has a matte finish that is less reflective than that of an indoor set, and the LCD screen is 20 percent brighter than the standard screen.

When viewing a SunBrite TV in a backyard on an overcast day with some glare, the picture seemed somewhat dim. It would be better in full shade.

An owner of the set said she thought the picture was excellent, though she watched mostly in the evenings. Even at twilight, she said the TV's brightness did not attract many bugs, although it did attract neighbors.

That was fine, she said, because they brought their own wine.

ROY FURCHGOTT

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This article originally appeared in The New York Times.


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