News


 Allegheny County Chief Executive Rich Fitzgerald responds to charges by Controller Chelsa Wagner.
Darrell Sapp/Post-Gazette
Allegheny County Chief Executive Rich Fitzgerald responds to charges by Controller Chelsa Wagner.

Fitzgerald, Wagner try to bury the hatchet over lunch

Both described the meeting as an effort to forge a more productive approach to the issues of county government.


 In this Nov. 1, 2014, file photo, an American Ethanol label is shown on a NASCAR race car gas tank at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas.

Latest U.S. proposal for ethanol could have political fallout

The Obama administration’s latest plan on ethanol, the corn-based renewable fuel, probably will not have a major effect on pump prices.



Moon residents lobbying for Port Authority bus ‘‍tweak’

Groups in Moon want to have it both ways: Port Authority bus service that picks up passengers rather than running empty on return trips.



Crawford County hit hard by tornadoes since 1900

It’s the county’s relatively flat terrain combined with unstable air above that may stoke thunderstorms into tornadoes.


Nation


Hastert case is said to be linked to decades-old sexual abuse

Federal prosecutors on Thursday announced the indictment of former House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert.



FBI: DNA lab errors extend to 1999

The FBI is telling crime labs that forensic data for thousands of cases may have errors related to DNA.


 

World


Talks on Asia’s migration crisis end with plans to target root causes

Delegates from more than 17 governments agreed to create job incentives, provide training and enhance “a sense of security and belonging.”



Water revolution in Israel overcomes any threat of drought

Desalination, recycling and conservation in the wake of a drought that began in 2005 have now given Israel all the water it says it needs.


 
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The Long Journey Home

A family photograph of Charles Johnston with Diana taken on an unknown date. On the back Diana wrote, "I am always thinking of you." He went missing when his B-24 bomber was shot down by the Japanese in New Guinea on April 10, 1944. It would take 70 years for his remains to be found and identified.
A special series by the Post-Gazette follows a Pittsburgh man's journey to the other side of the Earth to fight in World War II and the 70 years it would take for his remains to be found, identified and returned to the United States.

Read about Tech. Sgt. Charles L. Johnston Jr. and his homecoming.

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Early Returns


Perry on Politics: Flaws abound in 2016 presidential field

It seems that another Republican joins the race to win his or her party's presidential nomination almost every day. It was


Peduto hits the road again

Mayor Bill Peduto is on the road again less than 48 hours after returning from a three-night trip to Cuba described as an