Steelers release Ta'amu, sign WR from practice squad


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The Steelers released rookie defensive lineman Alameda Ta'amu this afternoon to make room to sign wide receiver David Gilreath from the practice squad.

Ta'amu, a fourth-round draft pick from the University of Washington, was charged with aggravated assault, aggravated assault by vehicle while DUI and fleeing an officer after an off-duty officer first spotted him driving the wrong way on Fort Pitt Boulevard and then heading over the Smithfield Bridge to the South Side on Oct. 14.

Three officers on foot attempted to stop him as he continued to drive erratically down East Carson Street, nearly striking them as they drew their guns and yelled for him to stop.

His SUV struck four parked vehicles on S. 14th St., injuring a woman who was sitting in one of them, and finally crashed into a Honda Civic.

It took four officers and two sets of handcuffs to restrain the 6-foot-3, 348-pound defensive lineman, who had a blood alcohol level of 0.196, more than double the legal limit, according to a police complaint.

He also is charged with leaving the scene of an accident, DUI and escape, all misdemeanors, in addition to several summary driving offenses.

The Steelers signed Gilreath, a rookie from Wisconsin, to the 53-man roster to add an extra receiver with Antonio Brown out with an ankle injury.

If Ta'amu clears waivers, he may be re-signed to the Steelers' practice squad. Steelers - mobilehome - breaking

Alameda was charged with aggravated assault, aggravated assault by vehicle while DUI and fleeing an officer on Oct. 14. First Published November 12, 2012 9:30 PM


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