Malkin offers apology of sorts for late-game tirade at officials


Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

Frustrated with losing, with his team being short-handed for the equivalent of more than half of a period, Penguins center Evgeni Malkin let loose with unflattering language toward the officials at the end of the 5-2 loss Wednesday night against Toronto.

He was assessed a 10-minute misconduct penalty.

By Thursday, Malkin was calm and ready to shoulder responsibility for his outburst.

"I lost control," he said after practice at Consol Energy Center. "We lost, and I was really mad. It's my fault."

Malkin was one of several Penguins who were puzzled by some of the minor penalties called. The Maple Leafs had eight power plays, for a total of 11 minutes, 40 seconds.

"Every year, they change the rules," Malkin said. "It's tough to play sometimes. But we'll just play how we can."

A chilly reception?

It was far from toasty when the Penguins landed Thursday in Winnipeg in advance of their game tonight against the Jets. According to forecasts, it might barely get above 0 degrees Fahrenheit during their stay.

"I'm looking forward to getting up there and waking up in that cold," Penguins winger Tanner Glass said. "I like the cold. I'm from up there. It's beautiful. That lets you know you're alive."

Glass, from Regina, Saskatchewan, spent last season with the Jets -- a season that saw the NHL return to Winnipeg.

"It was awesome," Glass said of the team's reception in Winnipeg. "It was like a playoff game every day."

Glass was part of the so-called GST line with Jim Slater and former Penguin Chris Thorburn. The GST is a Canadian tax.

Jets fans often single out an opposing player and come up with a clever heckle. Glass isn't sure if he might be targeted as someone who signed elsewhere and is making his return in another uniform.

"They love their team," he said. "I don't know what to expect."

A more likely mark is Penguins center and captain Sidney Crosby, who will be making his NHL debut in MTS Centre. He missed the teams' two games there last season because of health issues and wasn't in the league when the city had a team that eventually became the Phoenix Coyotes. This team is formerly the Atlanta Thrashers.

"It's an exciting atmosphere," Crosby said of the building. "I played there in world juniors."

As for taunts designed for him, Crosby said: "Sometimes, I hear them [in road buildings]; sometimes I don't. I guess I'll have to let you know after the game. They've definitely had a couple of good ones over the years."

2 minor league trades

The Penguins acquired forward Chad Kolarik from the New York Rangers in exchange for forward Benn Ferriero and received a conditional draft pick from Dallas for defenseman Carl Sneep.

Kolarik, 26, was a seventh-round draft pick by Phoenix in 2004. He was assigned to Wilkes-Barre/Scranton of the American Hockey League. He had 16 goals, 36 points in 41 games with Connecticut of the AHL this season after missing all last season because of a knee injury.

Ferriero was signed as a free agent in July and spent his time with the organization in Wilkes-Barre.

Sneep, 25, was a second-round draft pick in 2006 but had fallen far down the organizational depth chart. He has spent most of this season with Wheeling of the ECHL.

There was a time when Sneep, from Boston College, and Brian Strait, from Boston University, were considered strong prospects to play defense for the Penguins. Strait was a third-rounder in 2006. Now both are gone. Strait was plucked off of waivers by the New York Islanders last week.

penguins

For more on the Penguins, read the Pens Plus blog with Dave Molinari and Shelly Anderson at www.post-gazette.com/plus. Shelly Anderson: shanderson@post-gazette.com and Twitter @pgshelly.


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here