Larry Walsh on biking: Armstrong ride offers three trips

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The third annual Armstrong Trail fundraising ride/walk, known as Eat Play Ride, on May 17 is an early season event that features three distances.

Participants can choose an 18-mile round-trip ride from Kittanning to Templeton, a 30-mile round-trip ride from East Brady to Templeton or a 4-mile round-trip ride/walk from Templeton to Gray’s Landing.

There will be fruit and water at the starting points in Kittanning, Templeton and East Brady; a barbecue picnic lunch at Nautical Mile Campground in Templeton with live music and a fire pit with smores; and ice cream at the end of the day from the Old Bank Deli and the Mulberry Street Creamery.

The rain-or-shine event will feature “journeys of spectacular scenery, fabulous food and fun friendships,” said Toni Henry, president of the Armstrong Rails to Trails Association. The event is hosted by the association and the Allegheny Valley Land Trust.

The cost is $30 for adults and $15 for children aged 12 to 18. Late participants can register and pay May 17. All proceeds will be used for trail development. Bicyclists are asked to wear helmets — they’re mandatory for 12 year olds — and bring water.

Those starting at 10:30 a.m. from Kittanning can park in the lot behind the Church of God at 629 Woodward Ave. Those departing at 10 a.m. from East Brady can park at the trail head lot at the sewage treatment plant on Verner Street.

The ride/walk will begin at 10:30 a.m. from the Nautical Mile Campground at 530 Stone Ave. in Templeton.

The 36 mile Armstrong Trail from Rosston to East Brady travels along the former right-of-way of the Allegheny Valley Railroad on the eastern bank of the Allegheny River in Armstrong and Clarion counties. It includes several share-the-road segments.

The trail, one of my favorites, is a great place to bike, walk, jog and cross-country ski in a safe, relaxing environment. It is for non-motorized use only.

The ride/walk is sponsored by the Rosebud Mining Company, Snyder Associated Companies, Gatto’s Cycle Shop, MORCOR, CWM Environmental, the ACMH Foundation, the Farmer’s National Bank in East Brady, Watt Insurance, Bradigan’s, David Cippel, M.D., Mohney & Associates and Kay and Steve Owen.

Information: www.armstrongrailstotrails.org.

CycloFemme Ride

The Pittsburgh Major Taylor Cycling Club is hosting its first CycloFemme Bicycle Ride tomorrow — Mother’s Day — as part of Global Women’s Cycling Day, created “to honor the past, the emancipation of our grandmothers and great-grandmothers, the freedom to choose and the chance to wear pants.”

It’s also designed “to celebrate the present and the riders who keep it rolling, bringing women’s racing to the forefront, pushing the limits, breaking down barriers and sharing the love of the bike with everyone along the way.”

The road ride, also open to men, departs at 9 a.m. from 885 Progress St. at the North Side end of the 16th Street Bridge. It offers distances of 25 miles, 40 miles and 50 miles. It is one of more than 283 rides done in 235 cities, 42 states and 25 countries.

The Pittsburgh Major Taylor Cycling Club provides novice, intermediate and advanced cyclists the opportunity to ride, train and socialize with other cycling enthusiasts. It’s headquarters are in the Kingsley Center in East Liberty.

Marshall W. Major Taylor was the first African-American athlete to achieve the level of world champion when he won the 1-mile track cycling championship in 1899 after setting world records and overcoming racial discrimination.

Information: www.pmtcc.org; email majortaylorpittsburgh@gmail.com; www.cyclofemme.com.

Larry Walsh writes about recreational bicycling for the Post-Gazette.


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