Connor suspended for prank calling

LB 1 of 3 PSU players facing punishment

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later
Associated Press
Penn State linebacker Dan Connor, right, will face discipline for making a series of prank calls.
Click photo for larger image.

Three Penn State football players -- including starting linebacker Dan Connor -- face discipline after making a series of prank calls that "escalated to the point of harassment," athletic department spokesman Jeff Nelson said in a statement released yesterday.

Connor, a sophomore, has been suspended indefinitely. He still remains on the team, but the length of his punishment is unknown. "[Head coach Joe Paterno] will decide what level of participation he will have," Nelson, speaking by phone, said.

Consequences for the other two players, junior safety Nolan McCready and junior wide receiver Jim Kanuch, have yet to be determined. Other Penn State players may have participated in the prank calling, Nelson confirmed yesterday. After more facts are gathered, Paterno will determine the punishment for the remainder of those involved.

The victim of the prank calls, according to several sources, is a retired member of the Penn State football family. Nelson refused to comment on the identity of the victim.

The prank calls, which began in the late spring and continued through the summer, were investigated by the State College Police Department, leading to "summary offenses" for Connor, Kanuch and McCready. Those issued summary offenses -- akin to disorderly conduct charges -- are required to pay fines. A spokesperson for the State College police was unavailable last night to comment.

Last season, as a true freshman, Connor played in every game -- starting in four of them -- and finished second on the team with 85 tackles. Kanuch was switched from safety to wideout at the start of spring practice after playing sparingly last season. McCready, a fourth-year junior, is a reserve defensive back.


Chico Harlan can be reached at aharlan@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1227.


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here