The Affordable Care Act has caused frustration

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

Thanks to the crazy “implementation” of the Affordable Care Act, I just put yet another medical expense on my charge card that I would not have incurred had the service been performed last year — or had my employer’s health insurance renewal date been different in 2014.

Much has been discussed locally (and rightly so) about the Highmark-UPMC divorce, but I’ve seen very little about the blatant unfairness of the ACA regulation that at first disallowed insurers from offering certain health insurance plans and then was reversed to allow their continuation, potentially through 2015. But tough luck to employers whose plans renewed from January to March of this year!

Because my employer’s coverage ended Dec. 31, our plan as we knew it was no longer available Jan. 1 thanks to provisions of the act. The new “best comparable” plan that we ended up getting had many more (and higher) co-pays. Due to this, I have incurred literally hundreds of extra dollars in medical expenses in just the first half of this year. Imagine the overall toll when multiplied out to everyone who was denied their former coverage in a similar manner.

If this provision of the act had been applied justly and uniformly, I wouldn’t have such an issue with it, but to know that others in the region were able to retain the plan I could not (compliments of a different renewal date) and keep more money in their own pockets is extremely frustrating!

BEV COLLIER
Sheraden


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here