NRA rhetoric doesn’t change the facts

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I strongly repudiate the points Ted Round makes in his Nov. 25 letter “JFK and NRA.” The National Rifle Association doesn’t promote gun violence or sell guns? News to me.

Gun makers pay the NRA handsomely to make the political landscape favorable to selling guns. By blocking every sensible gun law, the NRA ensures unrestrained gun sales with nary a background check and is directly culpable for gun proliferation and violence in America.

As for JFK being a member, many famous people are. So what? How does that sanitize the image of the NRA? Besides, the NRA was a responsible group in JFK’s time and advocated a sensible balance between gun ownership and restrictions. Today, as a vociferous minority, it is the willful scourge of America.

It’s interesting that the gun apologists are so paranoid that they worry with even the smallest gun law we will descend a slippery slope to confiscation, but the same history Mr. Round extols shows just the opposite trend — a precipitous fall from the sensible regulations of Kennedy’s day to the deplorable situation we have today.

Perhaps someday, Mr. Round will set aside his solipsistic delusions and see that America would be a much safer place without so many guns. More guns equal more shootings. Fewer guns equal fewer shootings. Simple math cannot be overturned by misguided NRA rhetoric.

AL DUERIG
Greensburg


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