Political alcoholics

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Reading the Post-Gazette is like having an alcoholic in the family because you never know who is going to show up; the responsible, sober if glassy-eyed elbowbender, or the nasty drunk that breaks your heart.

We can remember the downfall of AHERF, the history of Westinghouse, the annual ski report, the Marcellus Shale story, the great sports stories, and be glad you still have your morning paper. But just as when that nasty drunk opened the door and your stomach turned over, I feel the same way when turning to the P-G editorial page and other opinion columns. In the few weeks since the presidential election that page has carried not a jot of conciliatory comment when it is sorely needed.

The smug and inane Tony Norman article about Romney rally music choices ("Rappers and GOP Bound to Make Music," Nov. 23), your editorial scolding of Sen. Marco Rubio regarding the age of the Earth ("Earth to Rubio," Nov. 23) , as well as Dan Simpson's Benghazi column ("Questions About Benghazi," Nov. 28) partially blaming the dead ambassador for his own misfortune show a pettiness at a time when greater stories and opinions need to be written.

Finally there is Rob Rogers who has a very even disposition -- always nasty. I lived on the street in New Jersey where Thomas Nast, the great political cartoonist had lived, and Rob, you're no Thomas Nast. Even he took a break from exposing Boss Tweed to invent America's vision of Santa Claus -- you simply pander to your own base of viewers.

Are you all afraid of a Republican resurgence in 2016 or is it simply fear of displeasing your publisher and editor-in-chief? Remember, you are breaking our hearts.

JOHN BARKER
Mt. Lebanon


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