Don't privatize state wine and liquor stores

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I am a student at the University of Pittsburgh, and I am opposed to Gov. Tom Corbett's plan for liquor privatization. It is an irresponsible idea that puts big business over working-class individuals.

I recognize that the Wine & Spirits stores are not perfect and certainly have the potential to modernize. However, fundamentally they have good selection, fair prices and employees who provide good service. Most importantly, they provide residents with jobs, ensure the safety of our neighborhoods by making sure that only adults buy alcohol and make a significant contribution to the state budget every year.

Under Mr. Corbett's administration, we have fallen from seventh to 49th in job creation. The citizens of Pennsylvania cannot continue down this path in order to take care of a few people who want to get rich selling alcohol in a private market. This liquor privatization bill is just another attempt to push a radical conservative agenda which puts corporations over working-class individuals.

The most despairing component is that Gov. Corbett is using education to cover-up the detrimental nature of this legislation. The same governor who has cut funding to public education and state-affiliated universities now suddenly "cares" about them. Well, what happens when the $1 billion from selling liquor stores is gone? This cannot sustain or even begin to make up for Mr. Corbett's disastrous cuts to education that my peers and future generations must now confront.

As a student and concerned citizen, I am opposed to privatization at the expense of employees, state revenue and ultimately the safety of our communities.

LARA SULLIVAN
Oakland


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