Bush should have been at the 9/11 dedication

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I’m interested in exactly why former President George W. Bush was not in attendance at the dedication ceremony for the 9/​11 memorial in New York City last week. I mean, the attacks happened on his watch. In addition, one could make the argument that, had his security advisers not been asleep at the switch, the attacks may not have happened or at least lives could have been saved if we’d known sooner.

I heard many reports that there was “chatter” in the pipeline prior to the attacks. Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that the Bush administration was responsible for the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. But for Mr. Bush to promote his sleeping chief security adviser to secretary of state was unconscionable in my opinion.

Then, to exacerbate the deaths of more than 3,000 people in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Shanksville, Pennsylvania, Mr. Bush put us into two wars that added another 4,000-plus U.S. casualties alone. During his tenure, he never honored returning bodies of the young men and women he sent to their deaths, nor even allowed photographs of returning caskets.

Given his role in this global tragedy, he should have taken the opportunity to pay homage to those he has disrespected since the 2001 attacks.

Oh well, maybe he can just paint a portrait of Condi and that will clear his conscience.

RICH VOLLER
Richland


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