Brazil's Leader Postpones State Visit to U.S.

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WASHINGTON -- Brazil's president has postponed her planned state visit to the United States next month because of anger at the revelations that the National Security Agency had intercepted her private communications.

President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil had been scheduled to arrive in Washington on Oct. 23 for the first state visit of Mr. Obama's second term. But she has been angered by reports of the spying in recent weeks.

The White House said in a statement on Tuesday that the "broad relationship" between Brazil and the United States "should not be overshadowed by a single bilateral issue, no matter how important or challenging the issue may be." For that reason, the statement said, Mr. Obama and Ms. Rousseff had agreed to postpone the visit indefinitely.

The two leaders discussed the N.S.A. revelations during the Group of 20 summit meeting in St. Petersburg, Russia, earlier this month. They spoke again Monday night about the state visit, the White House said, adding that Mr. Obama expressed regret over the spying on an ally.

"The president has said that he understands and regrets the concerns that disclosures of alleged U.S. intelligence activities have generated in Brazil and made clear that he is committed to working together with President Rousseff and her government in diplomatic channels to move beyond this issue as a source of tension in our bilateral relationship," the statement said.

The White House also said that a broad review of American intelligence activities was under way and that the two leaders agreed to put the visit off until after the spying issue is resolved.

world

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.


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