Random Acts of Kindness: A nurse getting into her car saved woman from choking


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Sitting in my car in the parking lot of the Wexford Post Office, I became choked while hurriedly eating a fast food hamburger before going inside to mail my Christmas package.

Panicking, I jumped out of my car and ran toward a young woman getting into her car. When she understood from my signaling that I was choking and couldn't breathe, she said, "Don't worry. You will be fine. I am a nurse."

In the middle of the parking lot, she performed the Heimlich maneuver until the food became dislodged.

Her skill, cool head and kindness saved my life; yet, being overwhelmed by the surreal situation, I neglected to thank her appropriately. I wish she could know that I consider her to be a hero and am truly and eternally grateful to her.

LISA BUTCHER

Sewickley

 

Group of men applauded for planning a good deed

On Jan. 18, my teenage grandson, preparing to return to his first year of college after a long winter break, accompanied me to the East Hills Giant Eagle for a few items. It's difficult for me to walk anymore, so his help was needed.

As we stood in line, awaiting our checkout turn, a male voice over my shoulder asked, "Have you ever heard 'pay it forward'?" It took a few seconds for me to internalize his question, and then I replied, "Yes, I have." He then told me that I was the recipient on this day of that kindness.

I then noticed about 15 African-African males, handsomely dressed in black, standing in the front of the store and smiling toward me. The young man paid for my order, and we exchanged a few words as I thanked him for putting a smile on this senior's face.

I eagerly look forward to reading Random Acts of Kindness each week, for it lifts my spirits to know that there are so many good/giving people in America, for sometimes you tend to believe that's not the case when there is so much negative media. I assured the young man that his group's act would not go unnoticed, that their unselfishness would reach beyond the boundaries of the East Hills Giant Eagle.

I would gauge these young men to be in their 30s to 40s, probably with families that they had left for a few hours on a busy Saturday afternoon to do something wonderful for their community. People should know that wonderful black men exist in our neighborhoods, even though they may not stand out as noticeably as those who prefer to prey rather than pray.

ELAINE LEE

Homewood

Even in a casino you find great example of honesty

Only in Pittsburgh would a person in a casino (Rivers) on the afternoon of New Year's Eve find a change purse with $60 to $80 in cash in it and turn it in to security.

I was so happy to get it back and to prove my husband wrong.

He had said "You can kiss that money goodbye" when I lost it.

Even though I had no luck playing the penny slots, I came home a winner due to the honesty and integrity of the person who found the purse.

I thank you very much and pray that God will bless you with many rewards through the rest of your life.

NANCY FABEL

Penn Hills

Someone in line offered a dollar, and it was worth so much more

In the Bethel Park post office on New Year's Eve I didn't have enough cash to pay for a small padded envelope I was mailing, and the lady behind me asked me how much more I needed. I told her $1, and she handed it to me.

I didn't want her to do that, but she insisted.

There are angels on Earth -- bless her! I appreciated it so much and hope she reads this note.

SHIRLEY ROSE

Bethel Park

Has someone done you right? Send your Random Act of Kindness to page2@post-gazette.com, or write to Portfolio, Post-Gazette, 34 Blvd. of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15222.


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