Girl, 13, who is brain dead will receive nursing care

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OAKLAND, Calif. -- A nursing home has agreed to provide long-term care for a 13-year-old girl, who has been declared brain dead but whose family maintains is still alive. A southern California facility agreed after another backed out, the family's lawyer said Friday.

Time is short for the family, as Alameda County Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo on Tuesday ruled Children's Hospital Oakland may remove Jahi McMath from life support at 5 p.m. Monday unless an appeal is filed.

Jahi underwent tonsil surgery at Children's on Dec. 9 to treat sleep apnea. After she awoke from the operation, her family said, she started bleeding heavily from her mouth and went into cardiac arrest. Doctors concluded the girl was brain dead Dec. 12 and wanted to remove her from life support. The family said they believe she is still alive.

Clinton to swear in mayor

NEW YORK -- Former President Bill Clinton will swear in Bill de Blasio as New York City's 109th mayor at the inauguration Wednesday, the mayor-elect's transition team announced in a statement Saturday.

Mr. De Blasio served in Clinton's administration as a regional director of the Department of Housing and Urban Development and was campaign manager for Hillary Rodham Clinton's successful run for the Senate in 2000. Mrs. Clinton will also attend the inauguration.

Mr. De Blasio will be sworn in using a Bible once owned by President Franklin D. Roosevelt that will be on loan from his presidential library in Hyde Park, N.Y., the transition team said.

Report warns about strep

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- The bacteria that cause strep throat may linger far longer on inanimate objects than previous lab tests suggested, according to University of Buffalo researchers.

Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of ear and respiratory tract infection in children, and Streptococcus pyogenes, the bacterial culprit behind strep throat and skin infections, lingered on surfaces in cribs, toys and books many hours after they had been cleaned, according to a study published Friday in the journal Infection and Immunity.

Conventional wisdom held that both bacteria died quickly outside a human host, and that the prevailing means of infection came through immediate human contact or via expelled droplets from coughing or sneezing.


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