National briefs: 4 killed, 6 hurt in plane crash

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- A mother on board a plane that crashed in remote southwest Alaska made a frantic phone call for help resuscitating her 5-month-old baby, then left the fatally injured boy to lead searchers hampered by cold and fog to the crash site.

Melanie Coffee, 25, of Mountain Village walked nearly a mile toward lights in the village of Saint Marys to meet rescuers Friday night.

"I believe she's the real hero in this," said Saint Marys Village Police Officer Fred Lamont Jr., one of the dozens from his community and surrounding villages who responded to the crash that killed four and injured six.

The Hageland Aviation Cessna 208 turboprop plane crashed around 6:30 p.m. Friday about 4 miles from Saint Marys.

Saint Marys, like scores of other Alaska villages, is off the state road system. People routinely use small aircraft to reach regional hubs where they can catch another plane to complete trips to Anchorage or other cities.

Megan Peters, a spokeswoman for the Alaska State Troopers, said the airplane would have been flying in freezing rain with a mile of visibility and a 300-foot ceiling. Officer Lamont described conditions as ice fog with moisture that stuck to vehicles.

Rape sentence targeted

HELENA, Mont. -- Prosecutors are going to Montana's highest court in hopes of securing a longer prison term for a former teacher who was given a 1-month-long sentence for raping a 14-year-old girl.

District Judge G. Todd Baugh tried to impose a new sentence after he came under fire from critics nationwide for the 30-day sentence he gave Stacey Rambold. The Montana Supreme Court, however, ruled that he could not modify the sentence after it had already been imposed.

In the latest twist to the case, state prosecutors are arguing in a brief filed Friday that the Supreme Court can impose a new, and tougher, sentence on Rambold. The student Rambold raped later killed herself.

Romney son aids rescue

SALT LAKE CITY -- Josh Romney, son former presidential candidate Mitt Romney, says he was first on the scene after a vehicle crashed into a house Thanksgiving night in suburban Salt Lake, and he helped four people from the wreckage.

The younger Mr. Romney told the Salt Lake Tribune that he was on the way home with his wife and children from Thanksgiving dinner with his parents when the car slammed into the kitchen area of the Holladay, Utah., home. He said the home was left "unlivable" but no one inside was hurt.

Hot-sauce odor mystery

LOS ANGELES -- After a judge ordered the partial shutdown of the Sriracha hot sauce plant in Irwindale, Calif., experts must now determine which parts of the factory's operation cause odors -- a decision that could affect next year's sauce supply.

Sauce maker Huy Fong Foods has already ground all the chiles for next year's supply of Sriracha hot sauce. The raw materials for its three sauces, Sambal Oelek, Sriracha and Chili Garlic, are created during a three-month harvesting and production cycle that concluded earlier this month.

But the sauce must still be mixed, poured, bottled and boxed, and so far, the city and the factory have not been able to agree on where the smell is coming from or how to mitigate it.

Church baby-sits for shoppers

CLAYTON, Pa. -- It was a parent's dream: a day to shop for Black Friday bargains without towing the young charges.

The First Presbyterian Church of Clayton in this town north of Philadelphia opened its doors to nearly three dozen youngsters Friday for its annual "Parents Day Out." With schools closed Friday for the Thanksgiving holiday, the event was also a day out for children.

While their parents hit the malls and stores, children ranging in ages from 3 to 18 spent six hours at the Gloucester County church on Delsea Drive, where they played games and made crafts in the fellowship hall and watched Finding Nemo movies in the sanctuary.



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