Pittsburgh school board rejects propose charter school for children with dyslexia

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The board of Pittsburgh Public Schools tonight rejected a revised application for the proposed Provident Charter School for Children with Dyslexia.

The school would have served 336 students by year five, beginning with 96 in grades 3 and 4. It would have been located at the current site of the Cardinal Wuerl North Catholic High School, which is moving from Troy Hill to Cranberry. Eventually, the school would have served grades 2 through 8.

The district's review team found the school did not provide expanded educational opportunities and its proposed programming is already used in the district.

It also said the proposal didn't meet other criteria, including lacking a comprehensive curriculum and professional development plan.

Before the vote, school board member Terry Kennedy said the district had received 11 letters of support from 64 residents of Troy Hill but only five district families had shown an interest in attending the school. She questioned why the district should take on the expense of monitoring the school if there was so little district student interest.

Provident Charter School previously sought approval in the North Hills School District and later was part of an unsuccessful bid to locate in the closed Schenley High School.


Education writer Eleanor Chute: echute@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1955.

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