For those who enjoy cooler weather, this week is Christmas in July

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If Monday felt unusually cool, that's probably because it was. At 72 degrees, the high temperature tied a record for that day set nearly 140 years ago.

Previously, the lowest high ever recorded for July 28 in the Pittsburgh region was 72 degrees, in 1875.

Today’s high is only expected to reach into the low 70s, which could near or match the day’s record of 69 degrees in 1981.

“It’s entirely possible that we could equal or break both of those records,” said Lee Hendricks, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pittsburgh, based in Moon.

In fact, this entire week will feel more like mid-fall as temperatures here are only predicted to reach the upper 60s and 70s. By comparison, temperatures around 82 degrees are normal for this time of year.

However chilly this week may be, this July may not even earn a place among the coldest. As of Sunday, the average temperature for the month was 71.5 degrees -- only 1.3 degrees below normal.

The coldest July on record was in 1976, with an average temperature of 67.4 degrees. July 2009 was No. 5 on the list at 69.4 degrees.

Mr. Hendricks said cold air traveling across the Great Lakes has produced cool temperatures and rain. So far this month, 4.89 inches of rain have been recorded -- 1.53 above normal.

“At least it’s not snow,” he said.

Molly Born: mborn@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1944.


Molly Born: mborn@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1944. First Published July 29, 2014 12:00 AM

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