Teamsters' 4-year contract with Allegheny County doesn't include retroactive raises

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Members of Teamsters Local Union 249, whose salt and plow truck driving members threatened to strike last week as a snow storm loomed, have signed a new contract with Allegheny County.

The contract, executed Feb. 12, covers the period from Jan. 1, 2013 to Dec. 31, 2016. Under the contract, union members received a 2 percent wage increase on Jan. 1, 2014 and will receive another 2 percent increase on June 1, 2014.

Wages will increase by 2.5 percent on Jan. 1, 2015 and again on Jan. 1, 2016.

The contract contains changes to health care, including small increases in deductibles and co-pays for doctor’s visits. The contract also increases employee health care contributions, from 2 percent in 2013 to 2.25 percent this year and in 2015 and to 2.5 percent in 2016.

The union includes about 60 Allegheny County employees, most of them truck drivers in the Public Works Department. Last week, Mr. Rossi, saying his union had been without a contract for 14 months, announced that they planned to strike.

He said then that the union was calling for a contract with wage increases of 2 percent for 2013 and 2014 and 2.5 percent for 2015 and 2016.

The strike did not occur. Mr. Rossi said Tuesday that the county and the union had reached a tentative agreement. The new contract was ratified by members Sunday.

Mr. Rossi said his “only issue” with the contract was that the 2 percent wage increase for 2013 was not instituted. But he said he encouraged his members to sign it.

“I recommended it is all I’m going to say,” he said.


Kaitlynn Riely: kriely@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1707.

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