Aha! Dictionary welcomes dozens of new words


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The dictionary just got a little bit thicker.

Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, that 114-year-old cataloger of words ranging from aardvark to zymosan, this week revealed about 100 new words that will be included in the dictionary's annual update.

The latest edition of the dictionary will include words and terms such as sexting, f-bomb, energy drink, bucket list and gastropub.

The words may be new to the dictionary, but they won't be new to the people who own e-readers (n.: a handheld electronic device designed to be used for reading e-books and similar material).

Or the people who suffer from brain cramps (n.: an instance of temporary mental confusion resulting in error or lapse of judgment).

Or who pursue their passion for craft beer (n.: a speciality beer produced in limited quantities.).

People such as Travis Tuttle.

Mr. Tuttle, who lives in Bridgeville and is one of the three founders of Butler Brew Works, knows craft beer. (And he likes gastropubs.)

He's not surprised that craft beer is just making its dictionary debut now, since the term microbrew has been used as a synonym for craft beer.

But from his perspective, the past five or six years have been big ones for craft beer.

"The industry is just booming like it's never been before," he said.

Today, David Young, 41, of Ligonier, will leave his software job to begin a new full-time profession: life coaching.

Life coach, a noun, is defined for the first time in the new dictionary as an adviser who helps people make decisions, set and reach goals, or deal with problems.

Mr. Young started working as a life coach on a part-time basis about a year and a half ago, coaching clients ranging from adults trying to transition careers to high school students considering college choices.

His job is to help people reach their "aha moment," another new word.

Still, half the people he talks to have never heard of the concept of a life coach, he said.

Well, now they can look it up in the dictionary.

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First Published August 14, 2012 8:00 PM


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