Seneca Valley schools could permit audio surveillance on buses

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

Seneca Valley School District officials will soon be able to listen to pupils on their buses as well as watch them.

School board members passed the first reading tonight of a policy that will permit audio recording on school buses. The district already has video surveillance equipment on all of its buses.

District spokeswoman Linda Andreassi said they must vote on the policy three times before it can go into effect. She said they expect to start using the audio equipment on buses next school year.

Jim Pearson, district transportation director, said the bus surveillance cameras are audio capable but the audio was shut off because state law did not permit audio recordings.

Mr. Pearson said state law changed last month when the governor signed Senate Bill 57 allowing audio recordings on school vehicles for disciplinary or security purposes.

The new law requires school districts to adopt a policy authorizing the use of audio equipment, to post warnings on buses that audio is being recorded and send parents written notices each year about the audio taping, Mr. Pearson said.

He said there should be no additional costs to the district for the audio on the buses, but the district has two vans without any video or audio monitoring equipment. Adding the equipment to those vehicles would cost about a $1,000 for each vehicle, he said.


Laure Cioffi, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com

Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here