Marshall adopts budget, though property tax rate not set

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Marshall supervisors adopted a $5.39 million budget for 2013 Monday night without setting a property tax rate.

Manager Neil McFadden said uncertainty regarding real estate assessment appeals caused the board to table the tax rate decision until next month.

Allegheny County Senior Common Pleas Judge R. Stanton Wettick Jr. approved a one-month extension on Monday, which means that all Pennsylvania municipalities now have an additional month to pass their final budgets and set millage rates.

The delay will give Allegheny County additional time to decide on property assessment appeals and for towns to base their tax rates on the new total, or aggregate, values for their taxable properties.

Marshall's property tax rate of 1.7 mills has not changed for more than a decade.

In anticipation of tax refunds to come as a result of the pending appeals, Mr. McFadden said the township has set aside $20,000 in its budget.

"Most of the pending appeals are residential in nature," he said, adding that some may not be resolved until the end of next year.

Mr. McFadden noted that the township had a good fiscal year in 2012, exceeding budgeted tax revenues by 10 percent.

"We had a strong performance among earned income taxpayers, due to an increase in wages and an increase in the amount of new wage earners in the township," he said, adding that the township has a balance of approximately $2 million in its general fund.

The 2013 budget includes an allocation of $960,000 for road resurfacing projects. "This will be a year of catch-up for road resurfacing," Mr. McFadden said.

Township employees -- office staff and public works -- will receive a 2.5 percent wage increase.

neigh_north

Jill Cueni-Cohen, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com


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