Countylines: News from Allegheny County council

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Thirteen of her immediate family members attended Community College of Allegheny County, Sharon Young told members of Allegheny County Council.

That personal statistic is one indication of the high regard she and her family have for the community college, Mrs. Young said. That admiration runs two ways. CCAC named her an outstanding alumna and to the board of its educational foundation.

The council recently added to her honors with a proclamation recognizing her excellence in business management. She and her two sisters are partners in McGinnis Sisters food stores.

CCAC faculty members were the best instructors she ever had, teaching her the math and accounting skills she uses daily on the job, Mrs. Young told council.

She and her husband, Walter, also a CCAC graduate, live on Mount Washington.

• This week is Prostate Cancer Awareness Week in the county and the council recognized the Obediah Cole Foundation for raising awareness of the disease and sponsoring Father's Day 5- and 10-K walks and runs. "We're about saving lives," foundation vice president Jerry Livingston said. "Don't be too proud to be tested."

The Father's Day event will take place Sunday at Riverfront Park, near Gate A of Heinz Field. More information about the races is available by calling 412-572-6830 or on the website www.fathersday5k.com.

Water in the courtyard fountain at the county courthouse has been dyed blue to call attention to the week.

• Pittsburgh's labor history has not always been pretty, Councilman William Robinson, D-Hill District, reminded his colleagues. The efforts of labor and civil rights activist Nate Smith to get more construction jobs and training for African-Americans illustrate that point, he said.

During the 1960s, Mr. Smith led protest marches and once lay down in front of a bulldozer in efforts to get more minorities into trade unions, Mr. Robinson said.

Mr. Smith died March 31 at age 82.

His children, Nate Smith Jr. and Renee Clark, accepted a council proclamation honoring their father's contributions to the community.

Ms. Clark, the dean of students at CCAC South Campus, described her father as a willing negotiator but also as a man who was never afraid to stand up for causes he believed in.

• Council honored nine officers who are retiring from the county police force as well as one officer who died while in service.

The retirees are Lt. Daniel E. Meinert; Detectives Terri Lewis, Edward W. Fisher and Robert Keenan; and Patrolmen William Abel, Anton Uhl Jr., Daniel Schwab and Merle L. "Slim" McGrew. Patrolman David Morrow joined the county police in 1987 and served until his death on Nov. 10.

Council also acknowledged the retirement of civilian employee Bobby Ammon.

• Ed Kirin, a life member of the Millvale Volunteer Fire Department, was recognized with a proclamation for his years of service to the department.

• Council gave certificates of achievement to five Girl Scouts and a Boy Scout for their accomplishments.

Staci Sutermaster, Carly Charchak, Libby Coleman, Cassandra Wozniak and Samantha Wildman of Troop 51429 in Robinson earned their Gold Awards.

Eric Zachary Trylko of McMurray, a member of Boy Scout Troop 225 in Bethel Park earned his Eagle rank.

• Blair and Carolyn Twale were honored on their 50th wedding anniversary. They live in the Greenock section of Elizabeth Township.

• Founded on June 3, 1911, the Rotary Club of Pittsburgh is marking its 100th birthday this month. Council presented the club with a certificate of recognition. Pittsburgh's club was the 20th founded in a service organization that has 33,000 branches around the world.

• Council added its congratulation to White Oak Emergency Medical Service for receiving accreditation from the independent Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services.


Len Barcousky: lbarcousky@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1159.


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