Record high in Pittsburgh makes way for new chill


Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

The record-setting weather that moved across Pennsylvania on Wednesday will seem like a dim memory today.

At 9:57 a.m. Wednesday, the temperature measured at Pittsburgh International Airport was 68 degrees, breaking the record high of 66 degrees set in 1916, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Rihaan Gangat. But, he said, it will be all downhill from there.

By 8 a.m. today, the bottom will fall out, with the temperature plunging by 40 degrees and snow accumulation building into the weekend.

Scattered flurries are expected to drop less than an inch of snow today as temperatures hover in the mid-20s, falling to 15 overnight into Friday. Temperatures will tick back up to 20 degrees during the day Friday and then dip to 10 later that evening. An inch to 2 inches is possible Saturday, when daytime temperatures will remain around 25 degrees.

The weather service also has posted a flood advisory for Pittsburgh, with the rivers at the Point expected to crest overnight today just above the level that floods the Mon Wharf. The wharf will be closed today and likely Friday.

Much of the rest of Western Pennsylvania -- from counties including Greene, Fayette and Westmoreland, and to the north and east -- is under a flood watch through this morning.

Downed trees were reported across the region Wednesday as morning wind gusts reached as high as 49 mph at the Allegheny County Airport around 10:15 a.m. and topped out at 67 mph at the Arnold Palmer Regional Airport in Westmoreland County about 30 minutes later.

Forecasters predict west wind gusts to reach 33 mph today and 28 mph Friday before lessening overnight into Saturday.

weather - neigh_city - region


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here