4 gadgets depict electronics trends


Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

LAS VEGAS -- Here are four gadgets that exemplified the top trends at this year's International Consumer Electronics Show.

Sony's 55-inch ultra-HD TV

The introduction of high-definition and flat-panel TVs sent U.S. shoppers on a half-decade buying spree as they tossed out old tube sets. Now that the old sets are mostly gone, sales of new TVs are falling. To lure buyers back, Asian TV makers are trying to pull the same trick again. They're making the sets sharper. This fall, Sony and LG introduced 84-inch sets with four times the resolution of regular high-definition sets. They provide stunning sharpness, but they're too big for most homes and -- at more than $20,000 -- too expensive. At the show, the companies unveiled smaller "ultra-high-definition" sets, measuring 55 inches and 65 inches on the diagonal. They will go on sale this spring. Prices were not announced, but will presumably be a lot lower than for the 84-inch sets, perhaps under $10,000.

Both the size and price of these smaller ultra-HD TVs should make them easier buys, but the higher resolution will be a lot less noticeable on a smaller screen, unless viewers sit very close. Analysts expect ultra-HD to remain an exclusive niche product for some years. There's no easy way to get ultra-HD video content to the sets, so they will mostly be showing regular HD movies. However, the sets can "upscale" the video to make it look better than it does on a regular HD set.

LG's 55-inch OLED TV

Organic light-emitting diodes, or OLEDs, make for thin, extremely colorful screens. They're already established in smartphone screens, and they have a lot of promise for other applications as well. For years, a promise is all they've represented. OLED screens are very hard to make in larger sizes. Now, LG is shipping a 55-inch OLED TV set in Korea, and is expected to bring it to the U.S. this spring for about $12,000.

Beyond being thin, power-thrifty and capable of extremely high color saturation, OLEDs are interesting for another reason: They can bend. LCDs have to be laid down on flat glass substrates, but OLEDs can be laid down on flexible glass or plastic. The major obstacle here is that flexible substrates tend to let through air, which destroys OLEDs, but manufacturers seem to have tackled the problem. Samsung showed off a phone that can bend into a tube. It consisted of a rigid plastic box with electronics and an attached display that is as thin as a piece of paper. The company suggested that in the future, it could make displays that fold up like maps -- big screens that fit in a pocket.

We're likely to see the benefits of bendable OLEDs sooner in a less eyebrow-raising but more practical implementation. It may never have occurred to you, but all electronic screens, except for cathode-ray tubes, are flat. With OLEDs, they don't have to be. LG and Sony showed TV sets with concave screens at the show -- not very useful, but an interesting demonstration. In the future, you could have a phone with a screen that laps over onto the edges, providing you with "smart" buttons with labels that change depending on whether you're in camera mode or music mode. You could have a coffee mug with a wraparound news and weather ticker. A revolution in design awaits.

By the way, you won't have to choose between ultra-HD and OLED screens -- Sony, Panasonic and LG showed prototype TVs that combine the technologies.

The Pebble watch

The Pebble is a "smart" timepiece that can be programmed to do various things, including showing text messages sent to your phone. The high-resolution display is all digital, so it can be programmed with various cool "watch faces." But what's really interesting about the Pebble is how it came to be -- and that it exists at all.

Young Canadian inventor Eric Migicovsky couldn't find conventional funding to make the watch, so he asked for money on Kickstarter, the biggest "crowdfunding" website. In essence, he asked people to buy watches before he actually had any to sell. The fundraising was a blowout success. Mr. Migicovsky raised $10.3 million by pre-selling 85,000 Pebbles. At CES, he announced that the watches were ready to ship.

Interactive gesture camera

This $150 camera, promoted by Intel, attaches to a computer much like a webcam. From a single lens, it shoots the world in 3-D, using technology similar to radar. The idea is that you can perform hand gestures in the air in front of the camera, and it lets the computer interpret them. Why would you want this? That's not really clear yet, but a lot of effort is going into finding an answer.

Samsung's high-end TVs already let viewers use hand gestures to control volume, and it expanded the range of recognized gestures with this year's models.

So far, though, the "new interaction" field hasn't had a real hit since the Microsoft Kinect add-on for the Xbox 360 consol. Consumers may be eager to lose the TV remote, but there's a holdup caused by the nature of the setup: to effectively control the TV, you need to take command not just of the TV, but of the cable or satellite set-top box. TV makers and the cable companies don't really talk to each other, and there's no sign of them uniting on a common approach. Only when both devices can be controlled by hand-waving can we permanently let the remote get lost between the couch cushions.

interact


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here