Trumpeter Sean Jones leaving Pittsburgh for Boston

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Trumpeter Sean Jones, who has been a professor at Duquesne University and a fixture in the local jazz scene since 2006, will be leaving Pittsburgh to become the chair of the Brass Department at Boston’s prestigious Berklee College of Music.

Mr. Jones is a Warren, Ohio, native with seven albums as a bandleader to his credit, including the most recent, "im•pro•vise — never before seen." He graduated from Youngstown State University and earned his master’s degree from Rutgers University. He was lead trumpeter for the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra for six years and has performed or recorded with Joe Lovano, Jimmy Heath, Nancy Wilson and Dianne Reeves, among others. He is also the artistic director of both the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra and Cleveland Jazz Orchestra.

Berklee president Roger H. Brown said in a statement, “Sean Jones brings an amazing portfolio to Berklee — performances at the highest level with the greatest musicians of his and prior generations, successful teaching experience, personal commitment and integrity as an artist, and a desire to help foster future great contemporary musicians.”

Mr. Jones noted, “When I was looking for colleges, Berklee seemed to be this shiny beacon on a hill that a kid from Warren, Ohio, couldn't quite get to. Fast forward 18 years, I never thought that I’d be in a leadership position at that shiny beacon. It’s surreal to me, and I’m honored to be given the opportunity.”


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