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Jerry's adds Bargain Basement

* As if Jerry's Records wasn't already a slice of heaven, now the legendary Squirrel Hill vinyl store is celebrating Black Friday and Record Store Day #2 with the opening of the new "Bargain Basement" in the cellar.

There you will find LPs, CDs, tapes, etc., for $1 or $2, and 45s for 50 cents.

"I had to rent the basement to get more space," Pittsburgh's favorite "hoarder" Jerry Weber explained.

"No more Vinyl-Paloozas," he added, referring to the summer sale at the Pittsburgh Irish Centre. "This is a 360-day-a-year Vinyl-palooza. No more Irish Centre and packing boxes and driving trucks around."

You'll get your fix of Kansas, Moody Blues, Journey, Billy Joel and Rod Stewart down there, and a whole lot else.

A few weeks ago, he says, "I got into a hoarder's house in Ohio. The guy died, and his wife called and said, 'Get this [stuff] out of here. He had 5,500 jazz CDs, like 300 different Louis Armstrong CDs. I'm selling them for two bucks."

Hours are 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 2136 Murray Ave., second floor. Call 412-421-4533.

Gathering Field reunites

* The Gathering Field, one of the bigger Pittsburgh bands of the '90s, has reunited in recent years for various one-off gigs.

Now, the band led by Bill Deasy and featuring Dave Brown, Eric Riebling and Ray DeFade, is making the reunion last, starting with a "brushing off the dust" show at Moondog's in Blawnox on Saturday.

"New songs, new record and many gigs in 2014," says the frontman. "Not sure why exactly, but it feels very very right."

The Gathering Field formed in 1994 and had its biggest success with the "Lost in America" album on Atlantic Records in 1996. It disbanded after 2001's "So Close to Home."

The show is at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 advance; $14 at the doors. For more info, go to www.gatheringfield.com.

Tribute to The Clash

* One thing not to give thanks for on this Thanksgiving Day is that we no longer have Joe Strummer on the planet.

But we can give thanks that he was here for a time and helped rock the culture (and the Casbah) with The Clash.

In honor of the British punk band, Pittsburgh's Guns of Brixton is reuniting on Saturday at the Rex Theater, South Side, to rev up a few sets of classic Clash.

Guns formed 10 years ago to memorialize Strummer with a performance of the "London Calling" record. This time, the band will feature songs from the band's entire career.

"We're hitting as many highlights as we can pack into one show," notes bassist Rod Schwartz. "The Clash wrote such a ridiculous number of great songs that it's impossible to squeeze in all of them, but we've worked hard to include a lot of the songs we think are the best and most important. Clash fans won't be disappointed."

It takes a village. Guns of Brixton is a 14-piece band -- including members of ATS, 11th Hour, Affordable Floors, Hector in Paris and the Spuds -- with two drummers, five singers and a complete horn section, The Four Hornsmen.

"The Clash were a four-piece, so you might wonder what all those people are doing up there," Mr. Schwartz says. "But we're not trying to ape the Clash's live shows. We're trying to capture the sound and the spirit of these songs as Clash fans know them best, the way they were recorded."

Joining them will be New York City's The Pretty Babies, a Blondie tribute band fronted by Tammy Faye Starlite (who performed as Nico at The Andy Warhol Museum in January).

The show is at 8:30 p.m. 21-and-over. Tickets are $13 advance; $15 at the door. 412-381-6811; www.rextheater.com.


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