Family Film Guide: 'Admission' and 'The Croods'

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The Post-Gazette reviews movies from a family perspective:

'Admission'

Rated: PG-13

Suitable for: Teens and older.

What you should know: An admissions officer for Princeton University makes a trip to an alternative high school, and it changes her life in unplanned ways. Tina Fey and Paul Rudd star.

Language: One f-word, about a half-dozen uses of profanity and a dozen and a half milder four-letter words.

Sexual situations and nudity: Couples kiss or are shown in bed after spending the night, but it's generally modest. There is talk about a one-night stand, a child placed for adoption and the results of an affair are obvious due to a pregnancy.

Violence/scary situations: In addition to a soccer ball to the face, which is played for laughs, there are references to a double mastectomy and a boy who was 2 when he lost his mother and uncle in a car crash and then was adopted. People shoot through trapdoors in fantasy scenes. A character sustains a minor injury in a fender-bender.

Alcohol and drug use: Adults are shown with gin or wine or other alcoholic drinks. Students party on a college campus although a key teenage character sticks to soft drinks.

'The Croods'

Rated: PG.

Suitable for: Kindergartners and older.

What you should know: This is an animated movie set in prehistoric times about a family whose cave is destroyed. Their mantra has been: "Never not be afraid." Fear is keeping them alive, insists the dad (voice of Nicolas Cage). When they're forced to relocate, they encounter a teenage boy who embraces inventive ideas, change and risk. Voice talent also includes Emma Stone and Ryan Reynolds. In (pricier) 3-D in select theaters; as always, you have to keep the glasses on throughout.

Language: Nothing notable.

Sexual situations and nudity: Just some teen flirtation.

Violence/scary situations: Has scary looking creatures, punches, falls and a boy who accidentally catches his clothing on fire (he is not harmed). People are treated like human footballs and launched through the sky, there are slapstick moments and natural disasters that split the ground, send cliffs crumbling and smash the family's onetime cave home.

Alcohol and drug use: None.

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