PEOPLE: Ann Curry, Archie Andrews, Garth Brooks and more!

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Is Ann Curry destined to rub elbows every morning with Rosie O’Donnell?

The Los Angeles Times reports that the former “Today” co-host — who tearfully exited NBC’s morning show in 2012 — is rumored to be in the running for a spot on ABC’s talk show “The View,” according to a report Sunday in the New York Post.

That would put her alongside O’Donnell, the famously gruff comedian known almost as much for her feuds as for her one-liners. O’Donnell will return to “The View” after a previous tenure ended in 2007.

Is Curry up to the Rosie challenge?

We’ll have to guess for now, since an ABC spokeswoman declined to offer any comment on the report.

But Curry is just one of many names being batted around as “The View” undergoes a major overhaul in the wake of exit announcements from Sherri Shepherd and Jenny McCarthy. Co-creator and recurring panelist Barbara Walters earlier announced her retirement.

Other possibilities include Leah Remini, who was previously squeezed out of CBS’ rival show “The Talk.”

Curry is still under contract to NBC and contributes international pieces through her “Reporting Our World” franchise. But a “View” gig would get her back on TV screens on a daily basis.

She exited “Today” following months of rumors concerning behind-the-scenes dissension on the show. Co-host Matt Lauer was often blamed in media reports for engineering her ouster, although he weathered the controversy and recently extended his contract with NBC.

Archie Andrews will die taking a bullet for his gay best friend, The Associated Press reports.

The famous freckle-faced comic book icon is meeting his demise in Wednesday’s installment of “Life with Archie” when he intervenes in an assassination attempt on Kevin Keller, Archie Comics’ first openly gay character. Andrews’ death, which was first announced in April, will mark the conclusion of the series that focuses on grown-up renditions of Andrews and his Riverdale pals.

“The way in which Archie dies is everything that you would expect of Archie,” said Jon Goldwater, Archie Comics publisher and co-CEO. “He dies heroically. He dies selflessly. He dies in the manner that epitomizes not only the best of Riverdale but the best of all of us. It’s what Archie has come to represent over the past almost 75 years.”

 

Andrews’ final moments will be detailed in “Life with Archie” No. 36, while issue No. 37 will jump forward a year and focus on the Riverdale gang honoring the legacy of their red-headed pal, who first appeared in comics in 1941 and went on to become a colorful icon of wholesomeness. Other incarnations of Andrews will continue to live on in Archie Comics series.

“Life with Archie” was launched in 2010 after Archie Comics writers envisioned alternate futures where Archie married both Veronica and Betty. Over the past four years, storylines in the more socially relevant series aimed at longtime Archie fans have included Keller’s marriage, the death of teacher Ms. Grundy and sometimes Archie love interest Cheryl Blossom tackling breast cancer and affordable health care.

Garth Brooks fans got new hope over the weekend that his five canceled concerts in Dublin, Ireland, might go on as scheduled this month. After a top Irish government official stepped in to help broker a deal, Ticketmaster has in turn postponed plans to start refunding money to the 400,000 ticket holders, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Alan Kelly, Ireland’s environment minister and deputy leader of the country’s Labor Party, joined negotiations between the concerts’ promoter and Dublin city officials who had denied permits for two of the five concerts, which had been scheduled for July 25-29. The permit denial prompted Brooks to say he’d only play all five concerts or none at the 83,000-capacity Croke Parke Stadium.

“I would be optimistic that the common good and common sense will prevail as the distance between all parties is not insurmountable,” Kelly told the Irish Times.

Some residents around the stadium had raised objections to the five concerts and cited an agreement between the athletic association that operates the stadium and the city limiting special events other than sporting matches to three per year.

But as the situation unfolded, the Irish Independent reported a criminal investigation into the suspected forging of 35 percent to 40 percent of the 380 complaints about the concerts that were presented to the city council. Those complaints were cited as a crucial factor in the council’s decision to deny two of the permits for the concerts.

Dozens of fans from around Ireland protested in Dublin over the weekend chanting “Let’s go, five in a row.”

Ticketmaster issued a statement saying it would hold off refunding money for tickets to the sold-out shows while the negotiations proceeded.

Fox says Gary Newman and Dana Walden, the two executives who run the company’s television studio, will also be in charge of the Fox broadcast network, the AP reports.

The appointment announced Monday aligning 20th Century Fox Television with the network brings back a structure that Fox had for five years, ending a decade ago. There are usually financial benefits to having a studio make programming for a network under the same ownership.

At the same time, Newman and Walden said the studio will continue making programs for other networks, and the network will remain in business with other studios. The two executives worked at the studio for 15 years.

Walden said there were no plans to hire an entertainment president for the network. Kevin Reilly’s recent exit from Fox triggered the changes.


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