Gwyneth Paltrow, Chris Martin, Phil Robertson, Mick Jagger, L'Wren Scott and more

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First comes the breakup, then comes the ... breakup moon?

The day before announcing their separation, Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin flew to the island of Eleuthera in the Bahamas, People has confirmed.

Wearing sunglasses and keeping a low profile, the two gave no indication anything was amiss between them.

"I just thought they were on vacation," says an observer at the North Eleuthera airport. "They didn't seem happy or unhappy."

A source close to Paltrow says the stars, who are parents to daughter Apple, 9½, and son Moses, 7½, retreated to the pencil-thin island (roughly two miles wide) to avoid the maelstrom of attention following the announcement that they are consciously uncoupling.

"They're in a somewhat isolated place, so they don't have to deal with it as much," says the source.

Paltrow and Martin aren't the first celebrity couple to share a breakup moon: In 2005, Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston famously vacationed together on the Caribbean island of Anguilla just one week before publicly revealing their split. Josh Lucas and Jessica Ciencin Henriquez headed to Colombia to visit her family shortly after announcing they'd divorced amicably.

Looks like the duck is cooked!

"Duck Dynasty's" season five finale bowed Wednesday night, but despite the series' vocally devoted cult following, the smash reality show brought in an audience of only 6 million -- the lowest rated finale since the very first season, E! News reports.

These numbers are a considerable drop when compared to the 8.4 million viewers who tuned into the season-four ending last year, as well as the 9.6 million who watched the season three capper in 2012. Overall, it's been a downward trend for season finales of the A&E hit.

Back in January, the "Duck Dynasty" season-five premiere had 8.5 million viewers, great for most shows on TV today, especially a cable show. However, its fourth-season debut in August had 11.8 million viewers.

The fifth season of "Duck Dynasty" was the first full season since family patriarch Phil Robertson made anti-gay comments in an interview with GQ.

Following his statements, A&E suspended the reality star but quickly lifted it shortly after Christmas amid fan protest and talk that the family would walk away from the popular show.

The day after Mick Jagger, 70, bid farewell to his longtime love L'Wren Scott at a private funeral in Los Angeles, People has confirmed that Scott's will bequeathed all of her possessions to the Rolling Stones singer -- a fortune estimated to be worth $9 million that includes the $8 million New York condo where she died in an apparent suicide on March 17.

"I give all my jewelry, clothing, household furniture and furnishings, personal automobiles and other tangible articles of personal nature ... together with any insurance on the property, to Michael Phillip Jagger," Scott's will stipulated. Signed on May 23, 2013, it also pointedly barred her relatives from inheriting a penny.

Scott was estranged from her sister, Jan Shane, 53, who lives in Scott's home state of Utah and was not invited to the L.A. funeral. However, she was close to her brother, Randall Bambrough, 58, who helped organize the funeral with Jagger and oversaw Scott's body being transported from New York to Los Angeles over the weekend. He also split Scott's cremated remains with Jagger.

Jagger, who dated the fashion designer for 13 years, already has an estimated net worth fortune of $328 million and is the fifth richest lead singer in the world.

The New York Daily News was the first to report this story.

An award honoring emerging fashion designers has been named for Scott, The Associated Press reports.

The award was created by The Art of Elysium, an organization that brings the arts to hospitalized children. The L'Wren Scott Amber Award honors Scott and Amber, a child who had a brain tumor and who participated in The Art of Elysium's fashion workshops for hospitalized kids.

Trace Adkins' wife has filed for divorce.

The country singer's wife of 16 years, Rhonda, filed papers in Tennessee on Tuesday, citing "irreconcilable differences," WSMV reports.

Rhonda is asking for primary custody of the couple's three daughters -- MacKenzie, Brianna and Trinity -- and for Adkins, 52, to pay child support, alimony and all her legal fees.

Adkins, who has battled alcohol addiction in the past, spent time in rehab in January after getting into an argument with a Trace Adkins impersonator on a cruise ship.

He left treatment in February to fly to Louisiana when his father, Aaron, 71, became ill, but his dad died a few days later. After his father's passing, Adkins returned to complete his treatment program.

Adkins' rep did not return calls for comment.

A college in upstate New York is offering a summer course on Miley Cyrus and won't even make students do any class twerk.

The Saratogian newspaper reports the course will be offered by Skidmore College, a private liberal arts college in Saratoga Springs.

Visiting assistant professor Carolyn Chernoff calls the course "The Sociology of Miley Cyrus: Race, Class, Gender and Media."

Chernoff says she'll focus on the 21-year-old performer and all her incarnations as a way to study such topics as gender, race, class, fame and power.

She says she got the idea after teaching a course on youth culture that featured video of Cyrus twerking at the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards.

But Chernoff says students will have to learn how to twerk on their own time.


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