People: Alec Baldwin, John Oliver, Anthony DeCurtis, Khloe Kardashian Odom and Lamar Odom.

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A Canadian actress was sentenced Thursday to six months in jail by a judge who found her guilty of stalking Alec Baldwin in New York, People reports.

Genevieve Sabourin, 41, who already faced 30 days in jail for repeatedly disrupting court proceedings during her trial, was well-behaved but defiant after the verdict was announced.

“I haven’t done anything wrong. I’m innocent,” she told Judge Robert Mandelbaum. “You’re doing a mistake right now.”

The judge found Sabourin guilty of stalking, attempted aggravated harassment, harassment and attempted contempt of court, saying she had no right to pursue contact she knew to be unwanted.

At the trial, Baldwin testified that the actress had turned his life into a horror film after they met once for dinner. He said she besieged him with unwanted phone calls and emails and started showing up at his homes and at public events.

“Your relentless and escalating campaign of threats and in-person appearances in private spaces served at a minimum to harass, annoy and alarm Mr. Baldwin, and intentionally so, and terrorized his wife,” Mandelbaum said.

Sabourin testified that she had a legitimate, though brief romance with Baldwin, and just wanted him to explain why he didn’t want to see her anymore.

In his summation to the judge, defense lawyer Todd Spodek said Baldwin “doesn’t have carte blanche to use the criminal justice system to sort out his relationships.”

“He set her up at a luxury hotel. He took her on a once-in-a-lifetime, fairy-tale date. ... Was Ms. Sabourin wrong to think that this was more than a one-night stand?”

The judge ordered Sabourin to serve the six months after the 30 days she previously received for contempt of court. There was no jury in the case, at Sabourin’s request.

John Oliver is set to exit Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” after landing his own weekly comedy series at HBO, the longtime correspondent announced on Thursday. Oliver has worked alongside Jon Stewart for almost eight years on the hit series, E! News reports.

“I’m incredibly excited to be joining HBO, especially as I presume this means I get free HBO now. I want to thank Comedy Central, and everyone at ‘The Daily Show’ for the best seven and a half years of my life,” Oliver said in a statement. “But most of all, I’d like to thank Jon Stewart. He taught me everything I know. In fact, if I fail in the future, it’s entirely his fault.”

Oliver’s HBO project will be a topical weekly comedy series that will debut in 2014; taking a satirical look at current news and politics, it will air Sunday nights.

HBO president Michael Lombardo said, “We weren’t otherwise searching for another weekly talk show, but when we saw John Oliver handling host duties on 'The Daily Show,' we knew that his singular perspective and distinct voice belonged on HBO.”

News of Oliver landing his own show shouldn’t come as much a shock after his success filling in for Stewart at “The Daily Show” when the host took the summer off to direct his first film.

Oliver isn’t the comedy series’ first correspondent to branch out: Stephen Colbert went on to helm "The Colbert Report" (with Stewart producing) for Comedy Central in 2005 after seven years on "The Daily Show."

Longtime music writer and Rolling Stone critic Anthony DeCurtis is writing a biography of Lou Reed, The Associated Press reports.

Little, Brown and Co. announced Thursday that it had acquired a book by DeCurtis. The writer interviewed Reed numerous times and wrote the liner notes for an anthology of songs by the group Reed led in the 1960s, the Velvet Underground.

Little, Brown bills the biography as offering “the inside story” of the brilliant and contentious artist. The book is currently untitled and doesn’t yet have a release date.

Reed, one of the most influential musicians of the past 50 years, died Oct. 27 at age 71. He was known for such songs as “Walk On the Wild Side,” “Heroin” and “Pale Blue Eyes.”

Anything can happen when it comes to the Kardashians.

But that sentiment rings especially true for Khloe Kardashian Odom and estranged husband Lamar Odom, who have been battling to save their marriage since news of his drug addiction broke this past summer.

Despite multiple sources indicating earlier this month that a split might be unavoidable, a source confirms to People that the pair, who have remained in contact throughout the ordeal, “have been going to therapy together.”

Lamar, 34, who was spotted with the family at Kane’s West’s L.A. show just a couple of weeks ago, has also been in therapy himself, as has Khloe, 29. “They’ve also been going separately,” says the source.

“The [Kardashian] family is supporting his recovery,” a insider told People at the time.

Khloe has been keeping a globetrotting schedule recently, arriving in London Thursday to promote the Kardashian Kollection.

As for what the future holds, the source says the couple’s marriage is still in question. “No moves have been made [toward divorce], but [it’s] just not clear what’s going to happen.

CBS is planning a two-hour special to mark the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ groundbreaking first appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” the AP reports.

The Feb. 9 special will be billed as a Grammy Awards salute to the Beatles. It will be recorded the day after the Grammys are held two weeks earlier. Top contemporary artists will cover songs the Beatles performed on Sullivan, a historic night in music that launched Beatlemania in the United States.

The special will be aired 50 years to the day the Beatles appeared on Sullivan, in the same time slot and on the same network.

No participating artists were announced Thursday.


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