2Do: Cultural events scheduled for the coming week


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MONDAY

Helene Cooper, White House correspondent for The New York Times, will discuss her work and her memoir "The House at Sugar Beach" at Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland, at 7:30 p.m. as part of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures Literary Evenings, Monday Night Lectures series. Her award-winning book is the story of her idyllic childhood in Liberia that became a nightmare during the April 1980 coup. Tickets: $15-$35, www.pittsburghlectures.org or 412-622-8866.

MONDAY

The Mary Pappert School of Music will hold a faculty recital featuring pianist David Allen Wehr and cellist Adam Liu of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. in the school's PNC Recital Hall. Mr. Liu also will play the erhu. A dessert reception will follow. A $10 donation is suggested.

MONDAY

Bricolage's Fifth Wall Series, a convergence of theater and current events, presents a staged reading of "The Predator," a play used to help groups explore drone warfare and beyond. A panel discussion with Thomas Sanderson, co-director for the Transnational Threats Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and the Post-Gazette's Daniel Simpson, a former Foreign Service officer, follows the 7 p.m. event at 937 Liberty Ave. Admission: $15 at www.bricolagePGH.org.

TUESDAY

The Tuesday Musical Club will present several singers in a free concert at 12:30 p.m. at Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. Margaret Ross Mehl, Katherine Soroka, Catherine Bornstein, Charlotte Sonne and Michele Gray-Schaffer will perform works by Bernstein, Debussy, Mahler, Rorem and others. More at www.tuesdaymusicalclub.org.

WEDNESDAY

Violinist Cyrus Forough and pianist Sung-Im Kim will perform at a free Carnegie Mellon University faculty recital at 8 p.m. at the Kresge Theatre, Oakland. The concert will feature works by Belgian composers including Eugene Ysaye's "Poeme Elegiaque," Rafael D'Haene's Violin Sonata and Cesar Franck's Violin Sonata in A Major.

WEDNESDAY

Yuna, a Malaysian singer-songwriter acclaimed for her catchy acoustic folk-pop, soulful vocals and personal lyrics, performs at Altar Bar, in the Strip District, at 8 p.m. Her latest album is "Nocturnal." Tickets are $18; www.thealtarbar.com.

THURSDAY

Concerned about the quality of your children's play? Worried you're robbing them of childhood while trying to get them through it safely? Join the discussion at "Playing It (Too) Safe: Play, Playgrounds, and the Value of Risk: A Community Conversation Around Play" from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Carnegie Museum of Art.

Participants include Susan Solomon, historian and author of "American Playgrounds: Revitalizing Community Space"; Wendy Nilsson, executive director of Partnership for Providence Parks (Rhode Island); Betty Cruz, nonprofit and faith-based manager for the Peduto administration; Cara Ciminillo, Pittsburgh Association for the Education of Young Children; Gabriela Burkhalter, curator of the Carnegie International 2013 "Playground Project," which examines exceptional playground design from the 1940s to 1970s; and other community representatives. The moderator will be Bill Isler, president of The Fred Rogers Company. Free; information at www.cmoa.org or 412-622-3131.

THURSDAY

A "Panel Discussion With Vanessa German and Dr. Edda Fields-Black" will begin at 6 p.m. at Concept Art Gallery, 1031 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square (free and open to the public). Ms. German's exhibition "Citizen Artist" has been extended through Saturday. Ms. Fields-Black, an associate professor in the Department of History, Carnegie Mellon University, is a specialist in early and pre-colonial African history whose research interests extend into the African Diaspora. Information: www.conceptgallery.com or 412-242-9200.

THURSDAY

Led by music director Manfred Honeck, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will perform a free concert at East Liberty Presbyterian Church as part of its Music for the Spirit series, which seeks to use music to promote the spirit and dialogue among faiths. Produced in partnership with the Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh, the concert will feature works by Martinu, Schubert, Dvorak and more. Associate principal violist Tatjana Meade Chamis will solo on Boris Pigovat's "The Holocaust." The Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh, directed by Betsy Burleigh, and the Concentio choir of Pittsburgh School for the Choral Arts, under Kathryn Barnard, also will perform. Tickets for the 7 p.m. concert, up to four per household, can be reserved at 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org.

THURSDAY

"A Steady Rain" opens at the New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side, at 8 p.m. Presented by barebones productions, the play, by Keith Huff, focuses on childhood best friends who work as Chicago policemen and a domestic disturbance call that challenges their friendship. David Whalen and Patrick Jordan star. Melissa Martin directs. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through March 2. For tickets, $30 in advance, $35 at the door: www.newhazletttheater.org, www.showclix.com or 1-888-718-4253.

SATURDAY

Cirque Zuma Zuma, an African-style Cirque du Soleil, performs at the Hillman Center for Performing Arts, on the Shady Side Academy Senior School campus, 423 Fox Chapel Road, Fox Chapel, at 7:30 p.m. The group has 120 members from 16 African nations. The show features cirque acrobats who made their North American prime-time TV debut on "America's Got Talent" as well as South African vocalists, gumboot dancers and contortionists, Zimbabwean percussionists, Egyptian limbo dancers, Gabonese tumblers, pole acts and more. For tickets, $25 adults, $20 seniors and $10 students, www.thehillman.org or 412-968-3040.


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