Briefing Books: Lauded poet Terrance Hayes heads to Pitt


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Terrance Hayes, the winner of the 2010 National Book Award for Poetry, is leaving Carnegie Mellon University to join the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh English Department as a full professor.

Mr. Hayes will teach a poetry workshop for graduate students this fall and two undergraduate courses in the spring term -- Intro to Creative Writing and Intro to Poetry Writing.

Mr. Hayes is a scholar and student of poetry, but he's cultivated a national reputation as a poet who can make the particularities of the African-American male experience into something universally accessible. He both reflects and interprets the experience of black males of his generation with wit, erudition and nuance.

Mr. Hayes earned his undergraduate degree from Coker College and his graduate degree in poetry from Pitt. He won the National Book Award for his 2010 collection "Lighthead." He's also the author of "Wind in a Box" (2006), "Hip Logic" (2002), which won the 2001 National Poetry Series and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award, and "Muscular Music" (1999), winner of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. His next collection of poetry is expected in 2015.

Mr. Hayes will be joined on the Pitt faculty by his wife, the poet Yona Harvey. Ms. Harvey will begin teaching in the spring term, but she will become immediately active with The Writer's Cafe.

Ms. Harvey is the author of the 2013 poetry collection "Hemming the Water." She's also the recipient of the Individual Artist Grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation. Her poetry has appeared in "Jubilat," "Gulf Coast," "Callaloo," "West Branch," "A Poet's Craft: A Comprehensive Guide to Making and Sharing Your Poetry" and many other journals and anthologies.

Mr. Hayes and Ms. Harvey have two children.

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