Paterno family lawyer: 'Game Over' book 'distorts the truth'

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The day after a new book on the Jerry Sandusky scandal hit the market, an attorney for the Paterno family issued a statement condemning it for "egregious use of false and slanderous statements" about the late coach.

Attorney Wick Sollers called "Game Over: Jerry Sandusky, Penn State and the Culture of Silence," written by Bob Dvorchak and Bill Moushey, an "unprofessional and irresponsible rehash from clip files and anonymous interviews."

Danielle Bartlett, the book's publicist at William Morrow/HarperCollins, declined to comment Wednesday. Without going into further detail, Dvorchak said: "We stand by our story. We encourage people to read the book and make up their own minds."

Sollers' statement noted two specific assertions in the book that he said were unsupported; both involving Joe Paterno's knowledge of Sandusky's actions.

He said the book contradicts Paterno's sworn testimony and "indisputable evidence" showing that the former Penn State coach was not informed about a 1998 allegation against Sandusky.

Assertions that Paterno pushed for Sandusky's retirement in '99 because of knowledge of his conduct also are unsupported by evidence, Sollers said.

"The price of their obsession with speed over accuracy is a book that distorts the truth and offers conclusions and theories for which the authors have no evidence," he wrote.

In an account of their experience writing "Game Over" published Sunday in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the authors, both former Post-Gazette sports writers, said that many of their sources wouldn't allow their names to be used due to a "tangled web of legal issues, job security and fear of reprisals."

The book, written over the course of 10 weeks and described by the authors as "the most demanding writing assignment we've ever tackled," was released Tuesday.

education - books - psusports - neigh_east

Liz Navratil contibuted. Taryn Luna: tluna@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1985. First Published April 19, 2012 1:15 PM


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