Carnegie Museum of Art names new curator of decorative arts and design

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Rachel Delphia has been appointed The Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design for Carnegie Museum of Art.

Ms. Delphia, 34, succeeds Jason Busch who left this fall to become deputy director of the St. Louis Museum of Art.

Ms. Delphia, who joined the museum in 2005, became assistant curator of decorative arts and design in 2006 and associate curator in 2011.

She led the renovation of the museum’s Charity Randall Gallery in 2011, creating a space for modernist and contemporary design and craft. She coordinated major acquisitions, including an early modernist chandelier by Henry Van de Velde as well as a gift of contemporary craft and studio furniture from Deena and Jerome Kaplan of Bethesda, Md.

“I am proud to have been part of this department during a major resurgence of decorative arts and design,” Ms. Delphia said. “I see great opportunity to develop the 20th- and 21st-century design collection and to expand on our significant 18th- and 19th-century holdings.”

Ms. Delphia received a master’s degree from the University of Delaware’s Winterthur Program in Early American Culture. She also earned a master’s degree in English and a bachelor of fine arts in industrial design from Carnegie Mellon University, where she has taught design history and exhibition design.

Marylynne Pitz: mpitz@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1648.


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