Romero's 'Deadtime Stories' filming in Fayette


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Filming began yesterday in Fayette County on the first of a series of horror anthologies.

The principals behind "George A. Romero Presents ... Deadtime Stories" have a good pedigree in the horror genre. George Romero and his wife, Christine Forrest, are executive producers on the project.

"Deadtime Stories" will feature three short films written by Jeff Monahan, an actor, writer, producer and director who has worked on several Romero films, including "Bruiser" and "The Dark Half." Monahan is president of 72nd St. Films, a film and TV production company based in Connellsville, Fayette County, and in New York.

His company is collaborating with Matt Walsh of Los Angeles-based 555 Films and Romero to produce the project.

"Deadtime" uses mostly local actors and is being filmed primarily in locations in Southwestern Pennsylvania and New York.

The first story -- "Dust" -- is shooting this week at Penn State's Fayette County campus and in Connellsville. Michael Fischa is the director.

The story centers on dust samples brought back to Earth from Mars that can cure cancer and also have "some pretty wacky side effects," Monahan says.

Monahan will direct the second film, "On Sabbath Hill," a horror story set in a college campus, which will film next week in Uniontown and at Seton Hill University in Greensburg.

The third and final installment will be wrapped up by February, and Monahan anticipates a spring release for the project.

Monahan says there are several distributors interested in the project, with several options -- including theatrical release, DVD or cable deals. If the first venture is successful, a second "Deadtime" collection will begin production next spring, he said.


Adrian McCoy can be reached at amccoy@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1865.


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