Steelers win Super Bowl No. 6 with late drive


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TAMPA -- The Steelers not only have another Super Bowl victory to celebrate, it came in what may have been the greatest of them all and they have another play for the ages to go with it.

Santonio Holmes, Super Bowl XLIII MVP, caught Ben Roethlisberger's 6-yard touchdown pass, keeping the toes of both his feet in bounds as he stretched out along the sideline for the winner with 35 seconds left.

And that was not even the most dynamic play of the game.

The final score in this super Super Bowl was 27-23, and gave the Steelers their sixth Lombardi Trophy, the most of any NFL team. Holmes was named the game's most valuable player.

Holmes' touchdown catch saved the Steelers from what had been a fourth-quarter collapse by them at the hands of Arizona's Kurt Warner and Larry Fitzgerald. Warner threw two touchdown passes to Fitzgerald to overcome a 13-point deficit in a span of five minutes in the fourth quarter.

Fitzgerald scored on a short pass that he turned into a 64-yard sprint up the middle with 2:37 to go, giving Arizona its first lead at 23-20. It came after a safety against the Steelers at 2:58 cut the Steelers lead to 20-16.

The furious fourth quarter came after what many believe was the greatest play in Super Bowl history.

Call this one the Immaculate Interception, because the 100-yard interception return by James Harrison delivered their sixth Lombardi Trophy last night, the most in the history of the 43 Super Bowls.

Harrison's stunning touchdown on the last play of the first half turned the game around -- until it was turned inside out in the final quarter.



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