Rooney huddle revealed

Druckenmiller met 4 brothers in N.Y.

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The four Rooney brothers who are considering selling their shares in the Steelers franchise did more than meet with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell when they were in New York City this week.

They spent the previous day meeting with New York billionaire Stanley Druckenmiller, whose cash offer to purchase each of their 16 percent shares and gain controlling stock interest in the team is still being considered by the brothers.

The next day, Goodell publicly issued a stern warning that the league and its owners will do everything they can to ensure that Dan Rooney and his son, Art II, remain in control of the franchise.

The four Rooney brothers -- Tim, Pat, John and Art Jr. -- and their oldest brother, Dan, the Steelers' chairman, met for 2 1/2 hours Tuesday with Goodell at the NFL office on Park Avenue, a meeting also attended by three other league owners, including Tom Benson of the New Orleans Saints, chairman of the NFL's finance committee.

After the meeting, Goodell indicated that the league is not interested in anyone other than one of the Rooney family members being in control of the franchise.

Besides Druckenmiller, Dan Rooney and his son have made a bid for the 64 percent of the shares being offered.

Druckenmiller, the chairman of Pittsburgh-based Duquesne Capital Management, was approached by the four Rooney brothers several months ago and has made an undisclosed bid to purchase their shares.

On Monday, less than 24 hours before they met with Goodell, the four Rooney brothers met with Druckenmiller at his New York office to discuss the possible sale, which has some nuances remaining to resolve.

That deal could be complete within a week or two.

Druckenmiller is not involved in any discussion to purchase the remaining 20 percent owned by the family of the late Jack McGinley, mainly because he wouldn't need those shares to gain controlling interest in the franchise.



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