Spanier says he talked to Freeh group regarding Sandusky case


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Former Penn State University president Graham Spanier was interviewed "at length" by the Freeh Investigative Group which is probing the university's role in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal, according to a news release issued today by Mr. Spanier's attorneys.

In the written statement, attorneys Peter Vaira of Vaira & Riley and Elizabeth Ainslie of Schnader Harrison Segel & Lewis said, "Selected leaks, without the full context, are distorting the public record and creating a false picture. At no time in the more than 16 years of his presidency at Penn State was Dr. Spanier told of an incident involving Jerry Sandusky that described child abuse, sexual misconduct or criminality of any kind, and he reiterated that during his interview with Louis Freeh and his colleagues."

The interview took place Friday at the offices of Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis in Philadelphia at Mr. Spanier's request even though Penn State and the state attorney general have denied him access to his own emails from more than a decade ago, according to the news release.

The news release said that, since Mr. Spanier left the presidency in November, he has "wanted the Freeh Group to create an accurate report and has been determined to assist in any way he can."

It said his counsel will "revisit the issue" of Mr. Spanier's lawsuit over the emails.

"We have no further comment at this time and remain hopeful that truth and reason prevail," the news release sent by Mr. Vaira and Ms. Ainslie stated.

Mr. Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach,was convicted June 22 of 45 counts of sexually abusing 10 boys during a 15 year period.

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Education writer Eleanor Chute: echute@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1955. First Published July 10, 2012 4:45 AM


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