Penguins Notebook: Reward offered for Crosby's Olympic gear


Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

A Penguins teammate told Sidney Crosby about the $10,000 reward dangled by Reebok Canada over the weekend for the safe return of Crosby's wayward Olympic equipment. He is hoping the offer works.

"I appreciate them wanting to help me," Crosby said Sunday after he had an assist in a 2-1 win against Boston at Mellon Arena.

The missing items are the stick and gloves he used when he scored the winning goal in overtime Feb. 28 to give Canada a 3-2 win against the United States in the gold-medal game in Vancouver. He tossed them during the immediate celebration, and they were nowhere to be found when equipment was sorted a little later.

There are reports that one glove was recovered, but Crosby knows nothing about that. He got his mouth guard back and is using it in Penguins games.

Officials at Reebok, which has an endorsement deal with Crosby and supplies his hockey gear, said there will be no questions asked and the items will be returned to the Penguins center, although footage from that evening at Canada Hockey Place apparently is being used to help identify whoever might have had the equipment.

While he is not bent on someone being punished for taking the gear, Crosby is eager to find it.

"They're things that have meaning," he said. "If somebody knows where it is, I'd definitely like to have it."

He hasn't decided what he will do with the items if they turn up. He has heard reports that the Hockey Hall of Fame would like them and said he might accommodate it with one or all of the missing pieces.

Crosby is incredibly fussy about his equipment, which is highly personalized by the time he uses it in games, so he doubts anyone could successfully replicate the items for the reward.

"If somebody can copy those, good luck," he said.

Crosby had his jersey from the 2005 world junior tournament -- where Canada won gold in Grand Forks, N.D. -- stolen from his luggage. It later was returned.

"I don't know if they realize the kind of attention it gets," Crosby said of such stolen goods.

He guesses that if the idea is to sell the gear, "it would be done very privately, very discreetly."

Pond skate for Godard

Penguins winger Eric Godard hopes to get on the ice today to test his injured groin.

"I'm going to go for a 'pond skate,'" Godard said.

He was hurt Jan. 25, and the original prognosis had him out four to six weeks. Godard is hopeful he will be cleared to play this month.

Calming voice

Sometimes, a situation calls for a player to overlook who is wearing what color of jersey. Crosby made an effort to settle down friend, part-time Olympics linemate and Boston center Patrice Bergeron while Bruins center Marc Savard was taken off on a stretcher in the third period after a hit by the Penguins' Matt Cooke.

"It's a terrible situation when you've got a guy hurt like that," Crosby said. "They're upset seeing a teammate and a friend lying there. For the odd time probably, I'm just trying to make things a little bit calmer over there."

Tip-ins

Penguins winger Alexei Ponikarovsky missed the last several minutes of the first period and the first minute of the second period while he was getting a cut on his wrist stitched. ... Penguins center Jordan Staal limped off the ice in the first minute of the second period after taking a shot by Boston's Dennis Wideman off the inside of his left foot, but Staal finished the game. ... The Penguins played without winger Bill Guerin (back spasms) for the third consecutive game. Defenseman Jay McKee was a healthy scratch.


For more on the Penguins, read the Pens Plus blog with Dave Molinari and Shelly Anderson at www.post-gazette.com/plus . Shelly Anderson: shanderson@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1721 First Published March 8, 2010 5:00 AM


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here