Soggy first full day at Augusta National

Players see some changes, especially at 17th


Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

AUGUSTA, Ga. -- The first full day at the Masters Monday turned out to be a short one.

Augusta National Golf Club was open for only two hours because of storms, still enough time for a few players to see some of the changes to the golf course -- even though this was supposed to be a year with really no change at all.

An ice storm in February that led to the demise of the famous Eisenhower Tree also cost the club countless other trees, giving Augusta a slightly different look. Instead of a forest of Georgia pines, players can see from the 10th fairway all the way across to the 15th fairway. Players couldn't help but notice the number of trees missing from the right side of the narrow, claustrophobic seventh fairway.

"You don't feel like you're going down a bowling alley as much," Brandt Snedeker said, his hair wet from wearing a visor in the rain.

The club lost thousands of limbs that were damaged from the ice storm, so many that Jimmy Walker said he saw workers up in the trees with chain saws when he came to Augusta a few weeks ago for a practice round.

"I haven't played here a ton, so I kind of got the feeling you could see down through the golf course a little bit better than you used to be able," Walker said. "I don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing."

Some things never change. The course was starting to burst with color. The greens already had a tinge of yellow to them. And there was a buzz about the Masters, even without Tiger Woods around for the first time in 20 years because of recent back surgery.

Still, nothing stood out quite like the 17th hole.

Masters champion Adam Scott always assumed the 440-yard par 4 was a dogleg left because of the 65-foot high loblolly pine that jutted out from the left side about 220 yards from the tee, forcing shots to the right except for the big hitters who could take it over the tree.

Canadian Mike Weir, the 2003 winner, is not one of the big hitters, so when asked how he found the 17th hole, he smiled.

"Much friendlier," he said. "I was playing with Jason Day. For him, it doesn't matter. He hits it high and long enough. For me, I had to hit around it. It was probably the toughest drive on the course. Now, it's much easier."

It was amazing to him to walk up the fairway and see a patch of pine straw where the tree once stood so proud and tall. Weir and several other players assumed that Augusta National would have another pine placed their before the Masters.

Maybe next year. But not this week.

The tree was such a treasure -- named after former President Dwight D. Eisenhower, a club member who hit into the tree far too often -- that it was taken off site for storage. The club will determine later what do with the trunk and what limbs remain.

But what a difference it has made already.

"If the tree was there, I would have hit it [Sunday]," said Patrick Reed, who arrived on the weekend and already got in two practice rounds.

The rest of the course should be the same as usual.


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here