Gary Schultz: Praised for his 'significant' leadership


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When Gary Schultz retired as Penn State's senior vice president for finance and business in 2009, his colleagues praised him as one of the most influential leaders in the university's history.

He had such an impact on the university, after spending more than 40 years there, first as a student, that the university named a child care center in his honor. The Gary Schultz Child Care Center at Hort Woods opened in September.

Mr. Schultz earned bachelor's and master's degrees in industrial engineering at Penn State and began work for the university in 1971, according to a biography on the school's website. He returned to work in an interim capacity in July, when his successor left the university.


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Sandusky presentment
(Warning: Contains graphic content)

Mr. Schultz, 62, of Boalsburg, Centre County, is expected to surrender and be arraigned today in Harrisburg on charges that he failed to tell police of a reported on-campus rape of a young boy by Jerry Sandusky, who was charged with 40 counts of sexual abuse of children.

Prosecutors said Mr. Schultz and Penn State athletic director Tim Curley failed to report the assault against the boy, which allegedly occurred in a football locker room shower, and tried to mislead a grand jury investigating Mr. Sandusky.

In the position he had held since 1995, Mr. Schultz oversaw the school's human resources, police department, and other operations. He has chaired the Penn State Investment Council, which is responsible for more than $1.6 billion, and played a key role in the planning and construction of university facilities.

After Mr. Schultz announced his retirement, president Graham Spanier praised his contributions to the university as "among the most significant in the history of Penn State."



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