The U.S. should reduce services and copy Canada in some respects

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Regarding Burger King’s move to Canada to avoid the highest corporate tax rate in the world (the United States’ 35 percent) and Presisdent Barack Obama’s thoughts:

Mr. Obama — “The lost revenue to Treasury means it has got to be made up somewhere, and that typically is going to be a bunch of hard-working Americans who either pay through higher taxes themselves or through reduced services.”

I, for one, vote for reduced services.

We can reduce services to the 60,000 illegals on the southern border and quickly send them home.

We can reduce the “services” of the Internal Revenue Service, which admitted that it violated the First Amendment rights of citizens to free speech. IRS officials admitted this, that is, before they all clammed up, took the Fifth and destroyed computer files. Mr. Obama called it a “phony scandal” with “not even a smidgen of corruption.” (Just a normal day at the office? I guess.)

But if the past is any guide, Barack Obama will refuse to cut any spending and apparently is willing to get his tax from “hard-working Americans” if need be, despite his claim of being the staunch defender of the hard-working middle class.

More puzzling, the Democrats wanted to copy Canada’s health care system as ideal. Why not copy Canada’s corporate tax rate (15 percent) also? Or Canada’s voter ID laws? (ID is required to vote in Canadian elections.) Canada can hardly be described as a right-wing dictatorship that “disenfranchises” voters and is run by corporations.

C. COLPO
Burgettstown


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