The conflict in Ukraine is troubling from a historical perspective

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I am a student of history. I am a high school student. I watch the history and military channels on a daily basis. I read dozens of books about the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, World War I, the Vietnam War and, my favorite topic, World War II. From the very beginning of aggression by Hitler to the Nuremberg trials, I have memorized many, many facts. Which is why I can easily connect the dots. So much of what is happening in Eastern Ukraine and Russia is similar to the beginning of Hitler’s aggressions. From entering territory in order to “protect ethnic Germans” to annexing Austria, Hitler believed in bringing back the glory of the German people.

Hitler was appeased until he invaded Poland. In all of the news coverage I have seen about the Ukrainian conflict, no one has mentioned the similarities between what happened in the 1930s and ’40s and what is happening now in Ukraine. Crimea wanted to rejoin Russia because of the ethnic Russians living there. Not to mention that President Vladimir Putin believes in fully restoring Russia to its former glory of the Soviet Union.

We cannot appease Russia. I’m incredibly concerned that no one is connecting the dots. And I fear that World War III is on the horizon, and it will be much more deadly than the more than 50 million deaths of World War II. Diplomatic action needs to be taken and quickly, before it’s too late.

LILY KONDRICH
Swisshelm Park

The writer is a junior at Oakland Catholic.

 


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