Thank you, Nathan Hershey, for all that you taught us

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I was shocked and saddened recently when I read Nathan Hershey’s Aug. 17 Forum article on death and dying (“I Cannot Manage to Die: Pitt Health Law Pioneer Explains Why He Wishes to Die and How the Law Won’t Allow It”). I remember his kindness to me as an older student returning to the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health.

Mr. Hershey’s sense of humor was refreshing: “Your answer is wrong, but your logic almost makes me change my mind.”

He made my understanding of health law possible through his animated stories and reference points. His passion for the subject was contagious. He made the subject interesting, informative and within our understanding as he talked to us as wannabe lawyers.

Unless someone might think Mr. Hershey was easy, let me make it clear that health law was his love and he wanted everyone to know and appreciate it. I thank him for all of the students who benefited from his wisdom.

Mr. Hershey, I pray that your final days are filled with joy with the knowledge that you made a positive difference in our search for knowledge. You were someone who had been there, done that and made your permanent mark in health law. When you enter the pearly gates, I know you will hear, “Well done, my good and faithful servant.” Peace be with you and yours.

MARGARET WASHINGTON
Homewood-Brushton


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