Graphic photos of abortions would make people think

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

Tony Norman’s column about how he is changing his opinion on the morality of televising executions has some excellent points (“Put the Horror of Executions on Public View,” July 25). While I would not want to watch it, if people today watched these executions, there could be a great deal less public support for the death penalty.

I also think that, for example, very explicit movies like “12 Years a Slave,” “Amistad” or “Schindler’s List” can serve to remind people of the horrors of the past in ways that may help prevent similar horrors in the future. It makes me sick to see what humans do to each other, even in fictional films where I know the person being harmed is an actor. The real thing is even worse.

I think graphic pictures of aborted babies can serve the same important function of “un-sterilizing” the horror of what some human beings are capable of doing to other human beings. Unfortunately, today we have romantic-comedy movies celebrating abortion (“Obvious Child”), people filming their abortions (Emily Letts), and smiling celebrities wearing “I had an abortion” T-shirts (Gloria Steinem). Those who used to take photos of themselves smiling next to lynching victims in the past haven’t gone away, they’ve just decided to smile about the killing of new victims.

I welcome the day the state neither kills nor permits the killing of human life, as guilty as the criminal or as unplanned or disabled as the baby happens to be.

Jeremy Samek
Murrysville


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here