Does he understand how his pension works?

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I read with stunned dismay Bill Frye’s “Why I Left Teaching” (June 15 Forum). Mr. Frye supports legislation that would weaken both the teachers union and pension system considerably. It’s an odd attitude for someone who is benefiting from both.

Mr. Frye also misrepresented the facts. While teachers unions are allowed to endorse candidates for political office, they do not use membership dues for any other political activity. The unions endorsed President Barack Obama based on his support for public education. If Mr. Frye’s preferred candidate had a better record on public education, the union would have endorsed him.

Mr. Frye also implies that teachers have their union dues withdrawn from their paychecks without their consent. This is false. The Paycheck Protection Act is a poorly disguised attack on teachers unions, which are the real paycheck protectors.

Mr. Frye also believes that the hybrid solution to pension funding will save taxpayers money. He must not understand how his own pension works. Essentially, Mr. Frye in his retirement will be living off the percentage of the earnings that I and my fellow teachers contribute from our paychecks, as well as what the school districts and the state contribute.

When all the pension funding for new teachers is placed in a 401(k)-type pension, these funds will no longer be helping to support the retirees. 

Where does Mr. Frye suppose the money will come from to make up for what’s not going into his pension fund? What are the chances that it will be taxpayers?

CATY DeWALT
Ross

 


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