Debasing society

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Daniel Greenberg (“Playing Games: A Pa. Commission Spreads Fallacies About Video Games,” March 4 Perspectives) is a very clever video-game maker and chief apologist for the ever-more lurid depictions of violence in his industry, from which he has made a pile of money. He gloats over the fact that a Pennsylvania commission could not find a demonstrably hard connection between watching images of violence — or directing them in games — and the carrying out of actual violence. He of course knows that establishing definitive links between influence and behavior is very difficult and that proving cause and effect to the degree that would justify legal restraints on such depictions is likely impossible.

But we know that the killer of the children in Newtown constantly watched violent video games. And precisely what is the value of now ubiquitous media violence? How does it ennoble this society? How does it help our children? Obviously, in no way. It instead debases us.

The fact is, thanks to people like Mr. Greenberg, we are the first society to deliberately, willfully pump violent and pornographic images into the minds of our children, 24/​7. But of course, there is no effect.

HANK BAUGHMAN
Latrobe


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