Detroit suggestion

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“The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible.” — George Washington, 1796

If Detroit would secede from the United States, its financial problems could easily be resolved.

Residents of the city would no longer need to pay federal income tax. The money, instead, could be used to pay down the city’s debt.

Perhaps the biggest benefit would be that it could apply for foreign aid from the U.S. government.

A precedent that would allow for the aid has already been established. One hundred percent of the countries that receive aid from our government do not pay taxes to the Internal Revenue Service.

Furthermore, the U.S. military would likely establish a base in Detroit to “protect our interests.” Money could be saved on police protection.

The net result would allow the citizens of this new country to work for less money. And American corporations would most likely move there to take advantage of the cheap labor.

Underfunded entitlements, crumbling infrastructures, dwindling tax bases are problems that many cities, small towns and states in our nation are facing. Detroit may be the equivalent of the canary in the coal mine.

If it is true, as some claim, that Detroit’s problems are the result of the shortsightedness of the city’s government, then it must also be true that all of us are myopic, as well! Money that has been sent out of the country for decades should have been invested here. Let us hope that it is not too late to heed Washington’s advice.

STEPHEN J. VEROTSKY
Johnstown

 


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