A worker’s day

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Having been employed in the fast-food industry my entire career, I am interested in the requested “strikes” called for by fast-food employees across the country. Even though I am in management and think that the proposed rate of $15 an hour asked for by the organizers of these strikes is out of line, I am in their corner.

Before you get mad when taking back a sandwich that has pickles on it when you requested none, please look at what the average fast-food employee goes through every day.

1. An ever-increasing menu that would test a master chef.

2. Bells and buzzers going off all day long telling employees that food is done cooking, that cars are at the drive-thru, that orders are being taken, that the product is old — too many to list here.

3. Managers yelling in the background “Faster, faster.”

4. And after killing themselves for four hours or so, being told, “Go home” because the store has to be under its allotted hours so the unit manager can collect a bonus this month.

I do not have an answer for the fast-food employees of today in how to solve their problems. They are much different than those from 30 years ago — as are the managers of today’s world. Fast-food workers of the ’70s and ’80s used the job as a stepping stone for bigger and better jobs. Today, people go from one company to another, hoping that the next place will be better than the last.

Before, managers were a nurturing, teacher-type human being. Unfortunately, they have evolved into slave drivers who expect perfection at all costs. So, before you take back that sandwich that was supposed to not have pickles on it, take them off yourself. You may be saving a person’s job and his or her ability to put food on the table.

DAVID BYERS
Cranberry 


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