We don’t need more of Congress’ ‘work’

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

I can’t believe that anyone in today’s day and age could be asking for more government, but Rick Ling’s letter (“Congress’ Lack of Work Ethic Is Outrageous,” Nov. 14) proves that a sucker is born every minute.

Mr. Ling, unquestionably, demonstrates a very political bias in his attack on Republican leaders of the House of Representatives while at the same time ignoring a Democratic-controlled Senate and White House.

Mr. Ling also attacks the Tea Party for wanting less government. Remember, Mr. Ling, the Tea Party really isn’t an organized political party; rather, it is the conscience of the people, fed up with government at all levels.

Mr. Ling concludes his letter by stating, “Americans demand a lot more from these grandstanding elected officials.”

I, along with the vast majority of America, don’t need “a lot more” rules, regulations and laws that only serve to enhance the lives of the politicians who write them, at the expense of taxpaying citizens. Why is it that after all these years of the war on poverty, the poverty level is at an all-time high? At the same time, ask yourself if you’ve ever met a poor politician from either party.

One only has to look as far as Obamacare to realize how much we don’t need government.

Mr. Ling, you remind me of the dog that went looking for fleas and ticks, only to find itself eaten alive, its blood drained and wondering why.

RON BOOCKS
Peters


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here